This topic contains 1 reply, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Avatar Phindy Simani 7 years ago.

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  • #1218

    I need help about the fractions.I do not no how to classify them from the smallest to the biggest.

    #1228
    Avatar
    Phindy Simani
    Participant

    it is better once you find common denominators.First make denominators the same, for example 2/3 and 7/8. 2/3 will be 16/24 and 7/8 will be 21/24, now you can see which is bigger and which is smaller. That is how I normally do it.

    #1352
    toni
    toni
    Keymaster

    You can show Phindy’s example, and many others using a fraction wheel. See the attachment for more details. Make a wheel mmarked out in 24ths and you can use it for comparing the sizes of lot’s of fractions (half, thirds, quarters, sixths, eighths and twelfths).

    #1362
    Avatar
    Ray Huntley
    Member

    Thabang, another approach is to build a fraction wall to compare fractions – this was one of the resources on your USB stick at the end of the course.

    #1421
    Avatar
    Sgqie Nohako
    Member

    To the learner, you must try revise equivalent fractions first, and it will be better to convert fractions to one common denominator.

    #1469

    Try to use real objects like sharing bread or cake anything in real life situation.sharing a cake between him/herself and his/her friend, how many equal parts? what do we call each part?They must share among 3,4,6 … friends and draw and write the fraction of each.They must compare size of each part practically first then you can use fraction wall(abstract level) using coloured leads

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